you turn and face your audience;

you glance out over the sea of upturned faces fresh with anticipation; 
You’re distracted… : 
It makes sense to you, will you be able to make it make sense to them?
Doubt plays with the edge of your notes: Notes that [now] lie faceless – in your hands.

In a split second the scene unfolding in front of you has changed. A gaping chasm begins to emerge between what you know and what you’re saying [about what you know].

It’s surreal; you have become the audience to the voice now echoing loudly in your ears; what you are hearing doesn’t sound right and  – it’s too late to begin again. Continue reading →

it’s like trying to catch a cloud…

… you think it’s real but in reality when you reach out, there’s nothing to touch.

‘In oral discourse, …there is nothing to backlog into outside the mind, for the oral utterance has vanished as soon as it is uttered.’ 1 When you stand to speak, unlike text on a page, nothing remains of the expression of the idea, because ideas expressed orally are sound-based, and ‘sound exits only when it is going out of existence.’  Your awareness of or your relationship with the sound of the idea is after the sound of the idea has gone. It is like trying to catch a cloud. You think it’s real but in reality when you reach out, there is nothing to touch.

Where writing establishes in the text a ‘line’ of continuity outside the mind… [where] the context can be retrieved by glancing back over the text selectively… always available piece meal on the inscribed page. In oral discourse this situation is different. There is nothing to backlog into outside the mind, for the oral utterance has vanished as soon as it is uttered.

Literally no tangible deposit exists of the thought or idea uttered live and orally. Continue reading →